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Author Topic:   Clipping cats claws - how much can be taken off???
pax
New Member

Posts: 6
From:Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand
Registered: May 2003

posted 05-26-2003 12:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for pax     Edit/Delete Message
I have a 17 yr old Burmese cat who is having difficulty retracting his claws - one on his outside front R pad has become impacted in the pad of this digit and cannot be pulled out - I need to clip it off then remove it. Does any one know - HOW MUCH OF A CATS CLAW CAN BE CLIPPED BEFORE HITTING THE NERVE??? I Look forward to your suggestions (so does Richard cream burmese). Thanks Adrian

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Greypaw
Member

Posts: 83
From:New Zealand
Registered: May 2003

posted 05-26-2003 12:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greypaw     Edit/Delete Message
Hi Adrian

When clipping you can only take off up to the blood vessel inside the claws. It can be seen as a tiny red line if your cat has white claws. If your cat has brown claws then it makes it more difficult for the novice.

Normally you only cut off the very tip, but for older cats that haven't been able to maintain their claw length themselves, they may need quite a lot trimmed to get close to the blood vessel.

I recommend you let your vet trim them this time round. Your vet can teach you how, and it is very quick to do and will need no drugs. Also with an impacted claw you should definatly have the vet do that one because something else may need to be done. You certainly can't just clip a claw off!

Hope this helps
Greypaw

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pax
New Member

Posts: 6
From:Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand
Registered: May 2003

posted 05-26-2003 12:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for pax     Edit/Delete Message
Hi Greypaw

Thanks for your really helpful advice - it is strange that the claw doesn't seem to be distressing Richard at all - maybe he has some geriatric peripheral neuropathy going on too!

I think you're right re seeing a vet as there may be infection etc ... but it is clear as you say that he really can't keep the length of the claws down too much now.

Thanks so much for replying!!

Very best regards

Adrian

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Isis
Member

Posts: 139
From:UK
Registered: Apr 2003

posted 05-26-2003 02:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Isis     Edit/Delete Message
Hi
If your cat is having problems retracting claws and is also suffering some nerves degeration it might be worth talking to the vet about having him declawed, especially if he is an outside cat.

It isn't a procedure I would normally recommend for a healthy young cat, as quite frankly it would be cruel to to remove the claws of a cat when they are still of use, but since your cat will find it more and more difficult and will begin to get himself stuck in materials it may well be the best option.

My Aunt's cat had it done when he was 14 and was no worse off for having no claws and certainly a lot happier for not finding himself stuck to the couch!

Tammi

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pax
New Member

Posts: 6
From:Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand
Registered: May 2003

posted 05-26-2003 04:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for pax     Edit/Delete Message
Hi Tammi

Thanks for your advice - declawing would be a sensible thing to do; does declawing mean a general anaesthetic or can it be done under local? I imagine it would be a general so the cat remains still. Richard may not tolerate a general procedure too well given his age.

Very best regards

Adrian

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Greypaw
Member

Posts: 83
From:New Zealand
Registered: May 2003

posted 05-26-2003 10:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Greypaw     Edit/Delete Message
I'm wondering if the claw has a ligament problem. Let us know what the vet says.

I had a cat that had his little toe sideways for about a year. It didn't distress him, but then I had another cat (his brother) that smashed both forearm bones had he didn't appear to be in much pain considering. Its amazing how unfazed they can be!

As for declawing, he might need that on the one claw, but the rest should be fine with clipping. All old cats start sticking to things, and clipping saves them a lot of stress.

Greypaw

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nern

Moderator

Posts: 1591
From:NY, USA
Registered: Oct 2002

posted 05-26-2003 11:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nern     Edit/Delete Message
Here is a site with pics. on how far to trim nails that I found very helpful: http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/cat_nails.htm
I agree that maybe the impacted claw needs to be removed by I do not recommend declawing all of the cats toes, especailly at the age of 17.

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pax
New Member

Posts: 6
From:Remuera, Auckland, New Zealand
Registered: May 2003

posted 05-27-2003 03:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for pax     Edit/Delete Message
Hey Nern

Thanks for the website address - its excellent. I dno't think Richard would tolerate the general anaesthetic for a total de-clawing.

Best regards

Adrian

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